Internet Marketing Resolutions 2008

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There are many things that 2007 taught us about Internet Businesses. I believe the following 5 items are the most important lessons learned that we all need to do to make 2008 an even better year: 1. Good site content continues to play a huge roll in search engine placement and website stickiness. I would not… Read more »

There are many things that 2007 taught us about Internet Businesses. I believe the following 5 items are the most important lessons learned that we all need to do to make 2008 an even better year:

1. Good site content continues to play a huge roll in search engine placement and website stickiness. I would not worry so much on quantity anymore, rather, quality. Put at the very least 1 good page of content on your site per week and you should be golden.
2.  Don’t just manage the click costs, make sure you see what the clicks are getting you on your website. Too many times I see people overly-managing cost of traffic versus quality of traffic. If a click costs you $1.00 and converts 1% of the time, I would rather pay for $3.00 clicks with a 4% conversion.
3. Use the data at your disposal – Google Analytics and other website tracking programs offers information that traditional brick and mortars would kill for. The problem is, you need to read it, access it and make a plan for it. Don’t just look at the data, make changes based off of it!
4. Worry about your site first. Visitors expect more now. They want interaction, ease of use, updated descriptions. It is difficult to get traffic to your site. Getting your site to convert could be the only thing online that you have direct control of.
5. Keep reading my blog. I promise ’08 will be packed with critical information necessary for you to be successful online.

Have an amazing year!!!

Worry about who is around you in search results

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The core focus of any business involved in a search engine marketing campaign (paid or organic) Is their positioning on a page. Position 4 is better than position 5, 2 is better than the 3..etc.  If you have decent rankings, something you should start worrying more about is who is around you.Data from a recent… Read more »

The core focus of any business involved in a search engine marketing campaign (paid or organic) Is their positioning on a page. Position 4 is better than position 5, 2 is better than the 3..etc.  If you have decent rankings, something you should start worrying more about is who is around you.Data from a recent poll at my company eVisibility suggests that search engine users visit an average of 6 pages before deciding on which site to do business with. This would tell me that as important of your actual positioning in the results pages is not the only thing to worry about.Who is under you? Who is above you? Changes are, that search engine visitor will be visiting all 3 site. If you are selling an identical product line to those under and above you, but have higher prices, or an un-friendly website experience, you will lose that visitor to your competitor.

Stay on top of who is around you..if they are doing a promo, you should too.  Make sure that if a visitor is going to both sites, you come out on top as far as offer, options and overall site usability.

Using Social Media to Help eCommerce Conversions

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In any  e-commerce business, converting customers is closer to fluke than anything. Compared to the numbers of offline retailers (around 30% of their visitors convert to customers) online retailers are lucky to see conversion above 1%. I have seen the following averages: -price point under $100 – 2% is obtainable -price point $100-$500 – 1.5%… Read more »

In any  e-commerce business, converting customers is closer to fluke than anything. Compared to the numbers of offline retailers (around 30% of their visitors convert to customers) online retailers are lucky to see conversion above 1%. I have seen the following averages:

-price point under $100 – 2% is obtainable
-price point $100-$500 – 1.5% is obtainable
-price point $500+ – .5%-1% is obtainable.

There are 2 major problems that effect online conversion rates:

1. the ease of leaving your store and the complete lack of commitment to get there in the first place./?
2. Unsure of the store…fear of non-delivery, fear of fraud, bad product, etc.

#1 above is a customers problem. There is little you can do to keep this customer here. #2 above you can control.  Something that I have seen work dividends on my client and own ecommerce sites is the use of customer testimonials, ratings, communications to the general public. It can solve several problem when strategically placed on your website:

1. Gives them the comfort that they are not the first person to order from your website.
2. Gives them the perception that they can speak their mind if it does not work out.
3. Gives them the extra push when deciding between your product and another website’s product.